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Youth Employment-related Country-Specific Recommendations

Belgium

  • Simplify and reinforce coherence between employment incentives, activation policies, labour matching, education, lifelong learning and vocational training policies for older people and youth.

Bulgaria

  • Accelerate the national Youth Employment Initiative, for example through a Youth Guarantee.
  • Adopt the School Education Act and pursue the reform of higher education, in particular through better aligning outcomes to labour-market needs and strengthening cooperation between education, research and business.

Denmark

  • Improve the quality of vocational training to reduce drop-out rates and increase the number of apprenticeships.

Estonia

  • Continue efforts to improve the labour-market relevance of education and training systems, including by further involving social partners and implementing targeted measures to address youth unemployment.

Spain

  • Implement and monitor closely the effectiveness of the measures to fight youth unemployment set out in the Youth Entrepreneurship and Employment Strategy 2013-2016, for example through a Youth Guarantee.
  • Continue with efforts to increase the labour market relevance of education and training, to reduce early school leaving and to enhance life-long learning, namely by expanding the application of dual vocational training beyond the current pilot phase and by introducing a comprehensive monitoring system of pupils' performance by the end of 2013.

Finland

  • Implement and monitor closely the impact of on-going measures to improve the labour-market position of young people and the long-term unemployed, with a particular focus on the development of job-relevant skills.

France

  • Take further measures to improve the transition from school to work through, for example, a Youth Guarantee and promotion of apprenticeship.

Hungary

  • Address youth unemployment, for example through a Youth Guarantee.
  • Implement a national strategy on early school-leaving and ensure that the education system provides all young people with labour-market-relevant skills, competences and qualifications.
  • Support the transition between different stages of education and towards the labour market. Implement a higher-education reform that enables greater tertiary attainment, particularly by disadvantaged students.

Italy

  • Take further action to foster labour market participation, especially of women and young people, for example through a Youth Guarantee.
  • Strengthen vocational education and training, ensure more efficient public employment services, and improve counselling services for tertiary students.
  • Step up efforts to prevent early school leaving and improve school quality and outcomes, also by reforming teachers' professional and career development.

Lithuania

  • Improve the employability of young people, for example through a Youth Guarantee, enhance the implementation and effectiveness of apprenticeship schemes, and address persistent skill mismatches.

Luxembourg

  • Step up efforts to reduce youth unemployment by improving the design and monitoring of active labour market policies. Strengthen general and vocational education to better match young people’s skills with labour demand, in particular for people with migrant background.

Latvia

  • Tackle long-term and youth unemployment by increasing coverage and effectiveness of active labour market policies and targeted social services.
  • Improve the employability of young people, for example through a Youth Guarantee, establish comprehensive career guidance, implement reforms in the field of vocational education and training, and improve the quality and accessibility of apprenticeships.

Malta

  • Continue to pursue policy efforts to reduce early school leaving, notably by setting up a comprehensive monitoring system, and increase the labour market relevance of education and training to address skills gaps, including through the announced reform of the apprenticeship system.

Poland

  • Continue to pursue policy efforts to reduce early school leaving, notably by setting up a comprehensive monitoring system, and increase the labour market relevance of education and training to address skills gaps, including through the announced reform of the apprenticeship system.

Romania

  • To fight youth unemployment, implement without delay the National Plan for Youth Employment, including for example through a Youth Guarantee.
  • Step up reforms in vocational education and training. Further align tertiary education with the needs of the labour market and improve access for disadvantaged people. Implement a national strategy on early school leaving focusing on better access to quality early childhood education, including for Roma children.

Sweden

  • Reinforce efforts to improve the labour-market integration of low-skilled young people and people with a migrant background by stronger and better targeted measures to improve their employability and the labour demand for these groups.
  • Step up efforts to facilitate the transition from school to work, including via a wider use of work-based learning, apprenticeships and other forms of contracts combining employment and education.
  • Complete the Youth Guarantee to better cover young people not in education or training

Slovenia

  • Take further measures to increase employment of the young tertiary graduates, older persons and the low-skilled by focusing resources on tailor-made active labour market policy measures while improving their effectiveness.
  • Address the skills mismatch by improving the attractiveness of the relevant vocational education and training programmes and by further developing cooperation with the relevant stakeholders in assessing labour market needs.

Slovakia

  • Step up efforts to address high youth unemployment, for example through a Youth Guarantee. Take steps to attract young people to the teaching profession and raise educational outcomes. In vocational education and training, reinforce the provision of work-based learning in companies. In higher education, create more job-oriented bachelor programmes.

United Kingdom

  • Building on the Youth Contract, step up measures to address youth unemployment, for example through a Youth Guarantee. Increase the quality and duration of apprenticeships, simplify the system of qualifications and strengthen the engagement of employers, particularly in the provision of advanced and intermediate technical skills.
  • Reduce the number of young people aged 18-24 who have very poor basic skills, including through effectively implementing the Traineeships programme.

More information is available in the European Commission Communication - Working togheter for Europe's young people. A call to action on youth unemployment

Source: European Commission

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